Aaron Lopez jewish slave trade master

 

 

A “few ventures” in the slave trade?

 

“Aaron Lopez (1731-1782) was the most notorious of the slave dealing Jews…Born in Portugal Lopez moved to Newport, Rhode Island in 1752, renounced his Marrano past and built an extensive trans-Atlantic slave dealing empire.

Below are the recorded slaving voyages of Aaron Lopez in the years 1764 through 1774:

 

Sloop Spry, Capt. Willaim Pinneger, July 16, 1764 – May 22, 1766, stopping at Barbados, Jamaica, and New York on the return voyage. The cargo included iron hoops, iron chains and slave shackles. Slaves sold: 57.

Brig Africa, Capt. Abraham All, May 3, 1765 – July 11, 1766. Slaves sold at Kingston: 45.

Sloop Betsey, Capt. Nathaniel Briggs, July 22, 1765 – August 21, 1766. Slaves sold at Kingston: 40.

Brig Sally (the Spry rerigged), Capt. Nathaniel Briggs, August, 1766 – July 1767. Slaves sold at St. Kitts: c. 33.

Brig Africa, Capt. Abraham All, October 20, 1766 – January 9, 1768. Slaves sold at Kingston: 69.

Brig Hannah, Capt. Nathaniel Briggs, May 3, 1768 – May 4, 1769. Slaves sold in South Carolina and Barbados: 63.

Sloop Mary, Capt. William English, June 4, 1770 – spring 1771. Slaves sold in Barbados: c. 57.

Ship Cleopatra, Capt. Nathaniel Briggs, July 1770 – 1771. Slaves sold in Barbados: 96.

Ship Cleopatra, Capt. Nathaniel Briggs, June 16, 1771 – May 27, 1772. Slaves sold in Barbados: 230.

Brig Ann, Capt. William English, November 27, 1772 – winter 1773-74 (arrived in Jamaica October 8, 1773). Slaves sold at Kingston: 104.

Ship Africa, Capt. Nathaniel Briggs, April 22, 1773 – August 1774. Slaves sold in Jamaica: c. 49.

Ship Cleopatra, Capt. James Bourk, June 30, 1773 – August 1774, Cargo consigned to Briggs. Slaves sold in Jamaica: c. 77.

Brig Ann, Capt. William English, spring 1774 – March 1775. Slaves sold in Jamaica: 112.

Mortality on these voyages was extremely high…

as many as, or more than, 287 Black Africans may have lost their lives in these two voyages of the Cleopatra alone…

He found it difficult to dispose of such cargoes and implied that slave cargoes were easier to handle and more profitable.

Journeying to Rhode Island with his wife and family on May 28, 1782, he passed Scott’s Pond, near Providence and was thrown by his horse into quicksand where he drowned.

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